Subscribe For Free Updates!

We'll not spam mate! We promise.

Monday, August 17, 2015

What is CAD | Sequence of CAD Section in Garments

     CAD is the most talking term in the design world as it is very helpful to design something new with accuracy. It is used with confidence to design anything from t-shirt to aircraft. Though CAD is most widely used in designing precision machine parts or giant building structure, it is also used in the garment and textile industries. It has started its journey in the textile and apparel sector in 1970s and till now it is giving its services.

CAD in garments

     CAD stands for computer aided design. It is a composition of software and hardware that helps the engineers or designers to design anything. Besides software, CAD needs good-quality graphics monitor, mouse, light pen or digitizing tablet for drawing and a printer.

     It has reduced hard labor and saved time to design anything by the engineers and designers. Before the entrance of the CAD system, they used to design anything by setsquare. They also used to design by hard working and taking a long time, but the designs were not so accurate. And now a day, they use CAD systems to design anything more accurately with a less time.      

Benefits of CAD
The benefits of CAD are as follows –
  • It has lessened the costs of product development.
  • It has increased productivity.
  • It has improved product quality and faster time to shipment or market.
  • It speeds up the design process.
  • As it offers great accuracy, there are fewer faults.
  • It also offers easy re-use of the design data and best practices.
Process flowchart of CAD section
I’m describing the process sequence of CAD sections of garments with an image –

CAD Section in Garments

You might like also

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Consumption calculation of basic long sleeve shirt for woven item

In the garment trade, consumption means quantity of raw materials with a view to determine the price of a garment. We can calculate the consumption of basic long sleeve shirt in two ways:
First system
      Length X Width
Formula = ………………………………...
        Fabric width X Fabric Unit
Collar
Length = 16” + 3.25” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 20.25”
Width = 1.75” + 1” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 3.75”
                                20.25” X 3.75”                                  151.875
Consumption = …………………… X 2 = ………………… =  0.10 yd
                                    44” X 36”                                             1584

Collar of shirt

Collar band
           Length X Width
Formula = ………………………………………… X 2
                               Fab. Width X 36” (Fab. Unit)
Length = 18” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 19”
Width = 1.5” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 2.5”                       
So, Consumption = (19” X 2.5”)/ (44” X 36”) X 2 = 95/1584” = 0.05” = 0.06 yd

Collar band of shirt

Yoke
          Length X Width
Formula = ………………………………………… X 2
                             Fab. Width X 36” (Fab. Unit)
Length = 24” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 25”
Width = 4” + 1” (Round) + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 6”
So, Consumption = (25” X 6”)/(44” X 36”) X 2 = 300/1584 = 0.189393 = 0.19 yd

Yoke of shirt

Back part
CBL (Centre back length) – Shoulder width = (Length X Width)/(Fab. Width X 36”)
or, 34.5 – 4” = 30.5”
Length = 30.5” + 1” (sewing allowance) = 31.5”
Width = 24” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 25”
Consumption = (31.5” X 25”)/(44” X 36”) = 787.5/1584 = 0.49715909 = 0.50 yd
Front part
Formula = (length X Width)/(Fabric width X 36”)
Centre front length = 32” X 1” (Sewing allowance) = 33”
Width (Chest) = 24” + 1” (Sewing allowance) + 3” (Pleat W) = 28”
So, Consumption = (33” X 28”)/(44” X 36”) = 924”/1584” = 0.583333 = 0.59 yd

Back and front part of shirt

Sleeve
Sleeve length = 23” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 24”
Sleeve width = (23” + 11.5”)/2 = 34.5”/2 = 17.25” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 18.25”
So, Consumption = (24” X 18.25”)/(44” X 36”) X 2 = 876”/1584” = 0.553 yd

Sleeve of shirt

Cuff
Cuff length = 10.5” + 1” = 11.5”
Cuff width = 2.5” + 1” = 3.5”
So, consumption = (11.5” X 3.5” X 4”)/(44” X 36”) = 161/1584 = 0.10 yd

Cuff of shirt

Pocket
Pocket length = 6.5” + 1” (Sewing allowance) + 1” Pleat W = 8.5”
Pocket width = 5.5” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 6.5”
So, Consumption = (8.5” X 6.5”)/(44” X 36”) = 55.25/1584 = 0.03488 = 0.035 yd

Pocket of shirt

Total fabrics needed
  • Collar = 0.10 yd
  • Collar band = 0.06 yd
  • Back yoke = 0.19 yd
  • Back part = 0.50 yd
  • Front part = 0.59 yd
  • Sleeve = 0.553 yd
  • Cuff = 0.10 yd
  • Pocket = 0.035 yd
So, total = 2.128 yards
Total fabrics = 2.128 + 5% (Wastage) = 2.128 + 0.1064 = 2.2344 = 2.235 yards (Ans.)
Second system
It is called shortcut formula for quick consumption
Total length = Body length + Sleeve length + Sewing allowance (In case of wash Garments. Washing allowance to be added with the above)
Body width = Chest width + Sewing allowance (In case of wash Garments. Washing allowance to be added with the above)
Formula = (Length X Width)/(Fab. Width X Fab. Unit)
Body length = 32” + 1” (Sewing allowance) = 33”
Sleeve length = 23” + 2.5” (Cuff width) + 1.5 (Sewing allowance) = 27”
Total length = 33” + 27” = 60”
Body width = 48” + 2” (S. A) + 3” Pleat W = 53”
So, Consumption = (60” X 53”)/(44” X 36”) = 3180/1584 = 2.007575 = 2.0075 + 5% (Wastage)
= 2.0076 + 0.10038
= 2.10798 + 0.95 (Shoulder one part)
= 2.20298 = 2.20 yards (Ans.)

Monday, February 10, 2014

Pattern and its making/preparation

The pattern | Practical pairing methods | Preparing the pattern

The pattern:
The pattern is the primary link between design and production and so must communicate accurately with all the functions that have to use the pattern. These functions are grading, marker planning and sewing. This information is conveyed by numbers, marks, nips and notches etc and not by written instructions. New sample patterns always require some explanation but there should be no necessity written working instructions when it comes to production. It should tell the complete story to all concerned.
It is also necessary for every component to be cut.  Each part must be marked on both sides with grain lines and direction indicators. Patterns should be paired when the garment is to be cut from open rather than folded fabric. Two practical pairing methods are by marks and by color:
Patterns should be paired when the garment is to be cut from open rather than folded fabric. Two practical pairing methods are by marks and by color.
·   By marks:
Cut pair for each component and mark an X on one side only of each of the two components when they are in a paired position. The blank sides indicate correct pairing as do the marked sides.
·   By color:
This method requires a pattern card with a different color on each side. Staple two pieces of the card together with the same color inside and then cut out the components. Pairing is achieved when the same color shows for a pair of the same component.
Patterns for asymmetrical garments should be prepared for positioning on the right side of the cloth only. A simple method to ensure the correct face-up positioning is to mark the components with a large X.
Every piece must be clearly identified as regards style number, garment type, the material for which the pattern is intended and the number of components in a set for a particular material, i.e. cloth, lining and fusible. A simple and standard method is to use a rubber stamp.
Preparing the pattern:
To ensure the correct positioning of the garment pattern within the cutting marker, every component has to be marked on both sides with direction indicators. Under most circumstances these indicators can be marked on the grain line. The garment patterns are not always used for one fabric only, so every new fabric which is to be cut from a previously used production pattern must be checked for its pile factor and the pattern markings changed if necessary.
Fabric pattern:
This refers to the form of the pattern on the right side of the cloth and has three aspects:
1)    One way:
This is where the pattern form dictates that the garment patterns in one direction only. For example, if the motif on a printed fabric is an upright human figure then it is preferable that the figures stand on their feet and not on their heads.
This is where the pattern form dictates that the garment patterns in one direction only. For example, if the motif on a printed fabric is an upright human figure then it is preferable that the figures stand on their feet and not on their heads.
2)    Two way:
This type of pattern form has a definite direction but it is not sufficiently dominant to warrant one-way only positioning.
This type of pattern form has a definite direction but it is not sufficiently dominant to warrant one-way only positioning. In most cases the pattern components for each size can be positioned one-up, one-down but this decision has to be carefully evaluated.
Consider the situation in a retail shop where two garments of the same style and fabric but cut in opposite directions, are hanging side by side on a display rail.
3)    Non-directional:
This type of pattern form has no definite directions and subject to the pile factor, pattern components for one size can be positioned in either length direction.
This type of pattern form has no definite directions and subject to the pile factor, pattern components for one size can be positioned in either length direction. Patterned fabrics also include checks and stripes.